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There’s a Supplement For Your Skin Issue

Naaila Khan

Beauty supplements have always seemed like too much of a good thing – a magic pill you can pop to zap those zits? Sounds too good to be true. But if you’re a firm believer in the ‘beauty comes from within’ adage, these powders and chews do make sense – treating the problem from within is a better bet than any topical creams and potions, and together, they’re sure to go a long way. Besides, supplements are simply different combinations of regular vitamins and minerals that target skin, hair and nails (hair and nails being non-essential organs aren’t your body’s first priority to nourish, so supplements in their cases make sense even more so), and an added boost of nutrients can never be a bad thing. Promising increased collagen, perfectly clear skin, balanced skin pH and other miracles, we’ve listed out some skin concerns that supplements might offer assistance to overcome – read up!

The Concern: Acne

The Supplement: Zinc and Vitamin B Complex

Known as an ‘essential trace element’, zinc is only required in small amounts for health, and a zinc supplement used in combination with topical antibiotics like erythromycin, is known to have acne-fighting powers. However, when taking it orally, make sure it’s not a very high dose, or even better, consult with a doctor first, as more than prescribed amounts can potentially make you ill.

The B complex vitamins (eight nutrients – B2, B2, B3, B5, B6, B7, B9) work to build immunity and and keep the nervous system functioning, and in doing so help to keep skin, hair, eyes and liver healthy. As food supplements, they help with clearing up acne in the long term, but if you’re looking for instant gratification, a vitamin B3 spray will help calm down inflamed acute acne flare-ups.


The Concern: Skin blemishes

The Supplement: Probiotics

Studies show that probiotics (much like living microorganisms in our gut) help reduce inflammation and skin stress due to oxidation, and possibly combat acne as well. Because what’s going on on your skin is a direct reflection of what’s happening in your digestive system, a diet supplemented by a mix of lacto and bifido bacteria or any high-quality probiotic (that hasn’t passed its expiry date) will help keep the natural ecosystem of your intestines intact and in turn contribute to clear, blemish-free skin.

 

The Concern: Anti Aging

The Supplement: Vitamins C and E, Drinking Collagen

While we know vitamins C and E are great antioxidants that work to erase wrinkles and dark spots when applied topically, the idea of ingesting them as supplements comes from the fact that they reduce free radical damage – from the inside. While this is true, it’s also true that when consumed in high doses, they can have detrimental effects, so keep your dosage in check.

If you’ve hit your 20s, you probably know that the magic ingredient for anti aging is collagen, the skin’s main supportive element that holds it up from sagging and wrinkles and that you need to restore as time goes to keep it plump. That’s where drinking collagen comes in – an Asian import, this newfound product is so popular even stateside, that women threw collagen-drinking parties to celebrate it. Many experts though, beg to differ on this one, their argument being that collagen cannot have any effect on your skin if you push it through your bloodstream. Instead, they recommend vitamin C to encourage collagen production. But, if you want to side the many women who swear by it, go ahead, it might just work for you too! Alternatively, a collagen peptide supplement might also do you good.

 

The Concern: Overall healthy, glowing skin

The Supplement: While some may brush off beauty powders as gimmicks, there are some others who claim that these combinations of different minerals, vitamins and superfoods have positive effects on your overall skin health. If you’re one to gulp down powder potions mixed in water, or chew pills consistently, there’s no harm trying them. Here are some popular miracle-workers, as believed by some.

 

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